Quick Links & Popular Tools

Menu

Courses and Educational Opportunities

  • Experiential-based Learning Opportunities

    +
  • The Centre for Global Studies celebrates the benefits of experiential learning opportunities, where students learn about and directly engage global issues through participation in community contexts and in learning with community members.  Such exercises may involve:  students taking placements with local community groups;  students participating in community development projects locally or internationally;  students exploring problems in volunteering; internships with both non–governmental and governmental organisations, locally and at a distance;  and students participating in courses driven by engagement with and challenges directed from persons working in non–academic vocations. Faculty in the Centre for Global Studies direct students to these kinds of opportunities as they arise through non–university programs.  However there are also university–based experiential learning opportunities offered regularly through the Centre for Global Studies and Huron University College more broadly.

    Courses

    Central experiential–based learning courses available through the Centre for Global Studies include:

        CGS 3201F/G – Think Global, Act Local

        CGS 3202F/G – Seminar in Global Studies

        CGS 3203F/G – Global Studies Participatory Project

        CGS 3204E – Global Studies Participatory Project

        CGS 3205E – Global Studies Internship

    It is also possible for students to develop independent experiential learning opportunities and, under the supervision of a faculty member, design an academic program of research, study and critical reflection around it for course credit. Such independent courses can be conducted under the auspices of CGS 3203F/G, 3204E, or 3205E.  And, these opportunities may involve working with and learning from a community group, a non–governmental organisation, a professional individual, or a government agency, in the form of a placement or internship.  If a student wishes to develop such a course, she must first find a faculty supervisor able and willing to construct, supervise, and evaluate a course of study in relation to the experiential placement.  And the student and faculty member should then submit the proposal for this course to the Director of the Centre for Global Studies for approval.  The proposal for this plan of study must involve the following elements:
    - a plan for significant academic study to be carried out prior to the experience, involving:  intellectual/theoretical preparation;  studying of contexts and knowledge pertinent to the experience;  and development of a critically–oriented learning plan to be carried out in the experience;
    - a plan for reflections and/or collection of data during the experience;
    - a plan for significant academic work to be carried out after the experience, reflecting on issues related to the experience itself
    - a plan for meeting ethical review in the case of data collection.


    Studying With Partners Elsewhere

    CGS 3203G Global Studies Participatory Project: Honduras and Guatemala
    This course provides students an opportunity to complement a 2-3 week work/study experience in Honduras or Guatemala with a course of study in the winter term. Course work in 2015 considers this experiential learning opportunity through the lens of ‘volunteer tourism’, and prepares students to consider the interaction of their own motivations, values and the facts of their own mobility in reference to the opportunity they have to encounter community life in Honduras or Guatemala. Students will prepare seminar presentations on key texts which explore aspects of the history and material circumstances of the community organizations they will work with, as well as key questions about the rise of non-governmental organizations globally, and the role of international volunteers in their functioning.
  • Levels of Global Studies Courses

    +
  • Centre for Global Studies 1000-level courses:  Introductory Courses

    The 1000-level courses offered in the Centre for Global Studies each provide rich and engaging introductions to relations, inequalities, systems, identities, and divisions around which the experiences of global life are currently formed and organised.  They also introduce to students intellectual and methodological problems and issues that one must face in doing the interdisciplinary scholarly work of Global Studies.  While each course fulfils these aims within particular themes and scholarly approaches, they all expose students to critical and interdisciplinary inquiry relevant to all courses and streams of study offered by the Centre for Global Studies.  Each introductory course is an equally fine beginning to a degree module in the Centre, and students are encouraged to take more than one.  Please note, though, that CGS 1023F/G is required for those students pursuing degree modules in Global Development Studies.

    CGS 1000E - Introduction to Global Studies

    CGS 1021F/G - Introduction to Global Culture

    CGS 1022F/G - Introduction to Globalization

    CGS 1023F/G - Introduction to Global Development

    Centre for Global Studies 2002-2004F/G:  Foundation Courses to Global Studies Degree Modules

    Students may pursue Centre for Global Studies degree modules in three streams of study:  Globalization Studies;  Global Development Studies;  and Global Culture Studies.  Each stream of study is grounded in a 2000–level course in which students will engage specific global problems, issues, themes, and relations that will orient and prepare them well for advanced study in that particular stream.  Each of these foundation courses invites students to study ways in which key concerns in these respective streams of study are formed and how these formations challenge us as scholars.  Strong emphasis is placed in these courses on developing analytical skills and knowledge crucial to success within the specific stream of study in which they are required.

    The foundation course for degree modules in Globalization Studies is:

        CGS 2004F/G - Critique of Capitalism

    The foundation course for degree modules in Global Development Studies is:

        CGS 2002F/G - Problems of Global Development

    The foundation course for degree modules in Global Culture Studies is:

        CGS 2003F/G - Discourses of Global Studies
     

    Centre for Global Studies 3001 – 3005F/G:  Methods and Theories in Global Studies

    Modules in each stream of study offered in the Centre for Global Studies, Globalization Studies, Global Development Studies, and Global Culture Studies, require students to complete at least one course in the study of scholarly methods and theory of particular relevance to that stream of study.  These courses ensure that students are sufficiently versed in skills, problems, and ideas related to research and analysis in the respective streams of study so that they are well prepared for advanced and graduate study and vocations related to their specific fields of interest.



    Degree modules in Globalization Studies require students to have completed:

                          CGS 3001F/G - Collaborative and Participatory Methodologies
      and either:  CGS 3005F/G - Theorising Subjectivity and Power
                  or:   CGS 3006F/G - Critical and Anti-Oppressive Methodologies

    Degree modules in Global Development Studies require students to have completed:

                       CGS 3001F/G - Collaborative and Participatory Methodologies
             and:   CGS 3006F/G - Critical and Anti-Oppressive Methodologies

    Degree modules in Global Culture Studies require students to have completed:

                        CGS 3005F/G - Theorising Subjectivity and Power
    and either:   CGS 3001F/G - Collaborative and Participatory Methodologies
                 or:   CGS 3006F/G - Critical and Anti-Oppressive Methodologies


    Centre for Global Studies 3100 – 3101:  Independent Study Options in Global Studies

    Students who wish to study a topic not covered in a course offered in the Centre for Global Studies or who wish extended and deeper investigation of topics covered in a Centre course may request permission to pursue such study within a course of independent study.  Students must apply to a faculty member from the Centre for Global Studies who is willing to direct and supervise this course, and permission must be obtained from the Director of the Centre for Global Studies to register in this course.

    Independent study options may be registered in either a single–term or full–year manner, as follows:

        CGS 3100E - Independent Research

        CGS 3101F/G - Directed Studies
     

    Centre for Global Studies 3200–level:  Experiential–based Learning Opportunities

    The Centre for Global Studies celebrates the benefits of experiential learning opportunities, where students learn about and directly engage global issues through participation in community contexts and in learning with community members.  Such exercises may involve:  students taking placements with local community groups;  students participating in community development projects locally or internationally;  students exploring problems in volunteering; internships with both non–governmental and governmental organisations, locally and at a distance;  and students participating in courses driven by engagement with and challenges directed from persons working in non–academic vocations. Faculty in the Centre for Global Studies direct students to these kinds of opportunities as they arise through non–university programs.  However there are also university–based experiential learning opportunities offered regularly through the Centre for Global Studies and Huron University College more broadly.

    Central experiential–based learning courses available through the Centre for Global Studies include:

        CGS 3201F/G – Think Global, Act Local

        CGS 3202F/G – Seminar in Global Studies

        CGS 3203F/G – Global Studies Participatory Project

        CGS 3204E – Global Studies Participatory Project

        CGS 3205E – Global Studies Internship

    It is also possible for students to develop independent experiential learning opportunities and, under the supervision of a faculty member, design an academic program of research and study around it for course credit. Such independent courses can be conducted under the auspices of CGS 3203F/G, 3204E, or 3205E.  And, these opportunities may involve working with and learning from a community group, a non–governmental organisation, a professional individual, or a government agency, in the form of a placement or internship.  If a student wishes to develop such a course, she must first find a faculty supervisor able and willing to construct, supervise, and evaluate a course of study in relation to the experiential placement.  And the student and faculty member should then submit the proposal for this course to the Director of the Centre for Global Studies for approval.  The proposal for this plan of study must involve the following elements:
        – a plan for significant academic study to be carried out prior to the experience,
            involving:  intellectual/theoretical preparation;  studying of contexts
            and knowledge pertinent to the experience;  and development of a
            critically–oriented learning plan to be carried out in the experience;
        – a plan for reflections and/or collection of data during the experience;
        – a plan for significant academic work to be carried out after the experience,
            reflecting on issues related to the experience itself
    -a plan for meeting ethical review in the case of data collection.
     
    Centre for Global Studies 3500-level:  Focused Issues, Problems, and Topics

    Within the 3500–level range in the Centre for Global Studies, students will find an array of courses concerned with specific issues, problems, and topics of interest across the streams of study available in the Centre.  These courses reflect the range of research specialties taken up by Centre for Global Studies faculty, and they give students the opportunity to gain focused study of and engagement with questions and issues of specific interest to their own learning.  Each Global Studies degree module requires students to complete a specific set of these courses, but they also invite students to study broadly across these offerings beyond these requirements.  All courses in this range, as listed below, are useful to students in each stream of study.

        CGS 3509F/G – Indigenous Peoples and Global Dispossession

        CGS 3511F/G – Language and Cultural Discourses

        CGS 3512F/G – Engaging Global Human Displacement

        CGS 3513F/G – Non-hegemonic Economics Forms and Global Captialism

        CGS 3514F/G – Global Resistance Movements

        CGS 3515F/G – Global Cultures of Gendering and Orientation

        CGS 3516F/G – Economies of Development

        CGS 3517F/G – Decoloniality

        CGS 3518F/G – Non–State Peoples and State Formations

        CGS 3519F/G - Global Inequalities Based on Sexual Differences

        CGS 3520F/G - Overcoming Management Paradigms in Global Development

        CGS 3521F/G - Non-State Spaces in Transition

        CGS 3522F/G - Global Mobilities   

        CGS 3523F/G – Law in Global Relations and Languages of Power

        CGS 3524F/G – Postcolonial Global Studies

        CGS 3525F/G – Community in Global Modernity
     

    Centre for Global Studies 3990 – 3999:  Selected Topics in Global Studies

    On occasion, a faculty member teaching in the Centre for Global Studies will decide to teach a new course for which there is not already a set course number.  In this case, she or he may have this new course assigned a "selected topics" number, until it is approved as a permanent course offering.  These selected topics numbers are used also to host courses offered by visiting scholars in the Centre for Global Studies which are not part of the regular teaching repertoire of the permanent faculty members.
        
    Selected Topics courses taught in the Centre for Global Studies over recent years have included:

    CGS 3999G — Perspectives on "Global Citizenship(s)"
    CGS 3994F — Civil Society and Development
    CGS 3993F — Latin America in Global Perspective
    CGS 3994F — Journalists Under Fire:  Witnessing International Human Rights
                Violations in a Globalized World
    CGS 3991F — Tourism in Globalization
     

    Centre for Global Studies 4000–level:  Honors Seminars


    The honors seminars offered in the Centre for Global Studies are courses for small groups of students, who normally take them in their fourth year of study.  These seminars emphasise close, rigorous, and critical engagements with documents, texts, analyses, problems, and theoretical investigations at the leading edges of contemporary scholarship in the paths of research developed by Centre for Global Studies faculty members.  In this respect, students benefit from the opportunity to investigate specific academic themes and problems within the scope of their professors' own current research agendas.  Honors seminars also emphasise the development of students' research, writing, and presentation skills.  Faculty members in these courses focus on helping students reach a relatively high degree of development in their academic talents for the purposes of enriching their learning, enhancing the quality of their scholarly accomplishments, and preparing them for possible advancement to graduate studies.

    The titles and descriptions of the honours seminars offered in the Centre for Global Studies are written with an intentional generality.  This is meant to permit faculty members the ability to teach them from differing perspectives and with different content from year to year.  To learn more about the specific approaches and themes being addressed in the seminars offered in a given year, it is best that students consult directly with the professors assigned to teach them.

    The honors seminars normally offered in the Centre for Global Studies are as follows:

        CGS 4010F/G – Honors Seminar:  Poverty

        CGS 4011F/G – Honors Seminar:  Identity/Difference

        CGS 4012F/G – Honors Seminar:  Ethics and Rights

        CGS 4013F/G – Honors Seminar:  Place and Movement

        CGS 4014F/G – Honors Seminar:  Gender

        CGS 4015F/G – Honors Seminar:  Power and Resistance

        CGS 4016F/G – Honors Seminar:  Globalization

        CGS 4017F/G – Honors Seminar:  Narrating Culture

        CGS 4018F/G – Honors Seminar:  Postcolonial Critique

    Also, resident and visiting faculty members may on occasion test out or offer an honors seminar focused in a different terrain of study under a "selected topics" course number, which occur in the range of CGS 4020 – 4029.
     

    CGS 4500E:  Honors Thesis

    Students pursuing an Honors Specialization in one of the three streams of study available in the Centre for Global Studies may apply to an individual faculty member to supervise her or him in the writing of an undergraduate honors thesis.  If a faculty member agrees to supervise her or him, the student will pursue this project with the faculty member as an independent study course over the full academic year.

    The work of an honors thesis ultimately involves completing a written document that is normally between 8,000 and 12,000 words in length.  It allows students to engage in the critical analysis of a topic appropriate to work in the Centre for Global Studies that is rare in its degree of depth and rigorous preparation for undergraduate study.  However, the thesis itself is an end–product written mostly in the second term, and that is based on considerable preparation in the first term.  Under the mentorship of her or his faculty supervisor, the student will:  investigate scholarly methods appropriate to her or his research interests and aims; conduct a considerable range of research on which to ground her or his study;  develop a literature review;  work through the process of preparing and gaining approval of a thesis proposal;  develop and fulfill a chapter plan;  and, finally, write and revise drafts of the thesis before submitting a final document for evaluation.

    Students may prepare their thesis projects with regard to any topic or question for which they are able to find a Centre for Global Studies faculty member willing to supervise.  Students' theses should concern problems over which their supervisors have a level of expertise.
  • Centre for Global Studies Courses Description

    +
  • Centre for Global Studies course descriptions are listed on the Western Academic Calendar.


Click here for 2017 Intersession Courses


Annual Course Offerings


2017-2018 Centre for Global Studies Courses
 Course Instructor
 
CGS 1021F Introduction to Global Culture
M. Franke
CGS 1021G Introduction to Global Culture
K. Lawless
CGS 1022F Introduction to Globalization
W. Russell
CGS 1022G Introduction to Globalization
TBA
CGS 1023F Introduction to Global Development
TBA
CGS 1023G Introduction to Global Development
L. Savino
CGS 2002F Problems of Global Development
L. Savino
CGS 2002G Problems of Global Development
TBA
CGS 2003F Discourses of Global Studies
M. Franke
CGS 2004F Critique of Capitalism
K. Lawless
CGS 2004G Critique of Capitalism
W. Russell
CGS 3001F Collaborative and Participatory Methodologies
W. Russell
CGS 3001G Collaborative and Participatory Methodolgies
TBA
CGS 3005G Theorising Sujectivity and Power
K. Lawless
CGS 3006F Critical and Anti-Oppressive Methodologies
L. Savino
CGS 3203G Global Studies Participatory Project L. Savino
CGS 3513G Non-hegemonic Economic Forms and Global Capitalism W. Russell
CGS 3515G Global Cultures of Gendering and Orientation
M. Franke
CGS 3516F Economies of Development
TBA
CGS 3517G Decoloniality
TBA  
CGS 3518F Non-State Peoples and State Formations
TBA  
CGS 3519F Global Inequalities Based on Sexual Differences
TBA
CGS 3520G Overcoming Management Paradigms in Global Development TBA
CGS 3522F Global Mobilities
K. Lawless
CGS 3523G Law in Global Relations and Languages of Power
M. Franke
CGS 3526F Challenging Regimes of Global Citizenship and Internationalization
TBA
CGS 4010G Honors Seminar: Poverty
L. Savino
 
CGS 4015F Honors Seminar: Power and Resistance
W. Russell
 
CGS 4017G Honors Seminar: Narrating Culture
K. Lawless

  • 2013-2014 Courses

    +
  • 2013-2014 Centre for Global Studies Course Outlines
    Course Instructor

    CGS 1021F Introduction to Problems in Knowing the World
    C. Dudgeon
    Course Outline
    CGS 1021G Introduction to Problems in Knowing the World
    C. Dudgeon
    Course Outline
    CGS 1022F Introduction to Globalization
    W. Russell
    Course Outline
    CGS 1022G Introduction to Globalization
    L. Savino
    Course Outline
    CGS 1023F Introduction to Global Development
    L. Riley
    Course Outline
    CGS 1023G Introduction to Global Development
    A. Vainio-Mattila
    Course Outline
    CGS 2002F Problems in Global Development
    A. Vainio-Mattila
    Course Outline
    CGS 2002G Problems in Global Development
    L. Savino
    Course Outline
    CGS 2003F Discourses of Global Studies
    M. Franke
    Course Outline
    CGS 2004F Critique of Capitalism
    D. Thorsen-Cavers
    Course Outline
    CGS 2004G Critique of Capitalism
    W. Russell
    Course Outline
    CGS 2340F Mapping the Middle East
    B. Punjabi
    Course Outline
    CGS 2341G Perceptions of the Middle East
    C. Dudgeon
    Course Outline
    CGS 3001F Applied Research Ethics for Global Studies
    D. Thorsen-Cavers
    Course Outline
    CGS 3001G Applied Research Ethics for Global Studies
    D. Thorsen-Cavers
    Course Outline
    CGS 3003B Gender and Development
    K. Grantham
    Course Outline
    CGS 3004A International Development Project Management
    A. Vainio-Mattila
    Course Outline
    CGS 3004B International Development Project Management
    K. Grantham
    Course Outline
    CGS 3005G Contemporary Critical Theory in Global Studies
    M. Franke
    Course Outline
    CGS 3201G Think Global, Act Local
    L. Savino
    Course Outline
    CGS 3202G Seminar in Global Studies: Activism
    A. Vainio-Mattila
    Course Outline
    CGS 3509F Indigenous Peoples and Development in Global Perspective
    L. Savino
    Course Outline
    CGS 3512F Human Displacement & Refugees
    C. Dudgeon
    Course Outline
    CGS 3516F Economies of Development
    B. Punjabi
    Course Outline
    CGS 3523G Law in Global Relations and Languages of Power
    C. Dudgeon
    Course Outline
    CGS 3525G Community in Global Modernity
    W. Russell
    Course Outline
    CGS 3994F Civil Society and Development
    A. Vainio-Mattila
    Course Outline
    CGS 4013G Honors Seminar: Place and Movement
    M. Franke
    Course Outline
    CGS 4016F Honors Seminar: Globalization
    W. Russell
    Course Outline
    CGS 4017F Honors Seminar: Narrating Culture
    L. Savino
    Course Outline
    CGS 4020G Honors Seminar: Modernity/non-modernity
    D. Thorsen-Cavers
    Course Outline